2019 Annual Report

Our work matters. We serve the people of Denver by championing accountability in our audit work and through education and enforcement of wage law on behalf of everyone

who lives and works here. After another year of meaningful work by the Auditor’s Office, I am pleased to present the 2019 Annual Report.

In this report, you will find summaries of our audits and highlights and impacts identified from our follow- up work, as well as the achievements of my exemplary staff as they serve the people of Denver, further their professional development and represent our office in the community. This report showcases the many accomplishments of Audit Services and Denver Labor’s Prevailing Wage and Minimum Wage divisions.

Report Details

Our work matters. We serve the people of Denver by championing accountability in our audit work and through education and enforcement of wage law on behalf of everyone who lives and works here. After another year of meaningful work by the Auditor’s Office, I am pleased to present the 2019 Annual Report.

In this report, you will find summaries of our audits and highlights and impacts identified from our follow-up work, as well as the achievements of my exemplary staff as they serve the people of Denver, further their professional development and represent our office in the community. This report showcases the many accomplishments of Audit Services and Denver Labor’s Prevailing Wage and Minimum Wage divisions.

Let me first extend my appreciation to the mayor, the City Council, the Audit Committee and members of the city’s operational management for supporting our mission throughout the year.

As an independent agency, we take an objective look at how public money is used and how efficient and effective the city’s services are for the people of Denver. Our work is performed on behalf of everyone who cares about the city, including its residents, workers and decision-makers. Our mission is to deliver independent, transparent and professional oversight in order to safeguard the public’s investment in the City and County of Denver.

In the past year, we took meaningful and extensive looks at several programs the public told us were of high importance to them. This year the mayor created a new agency to address some concerns identified in our homeless services audit. Members of the community from across the city reached out to call for the hotel at the airport to uphold the Auditor’s authority. And we found some agencies are doing a better job than others at following through on needed improvements identified in audit recommendations. Cybersecurity remains a priority for my team, as well as data analytics and continuous auditing.

One of the most notable areas of concern the public shared with me was Denver’s services for people experiencing homelessness. We conducted an audit and found a lot of money and good intentions, but not enough organization. The lack of a cohesive overall strategy along with unclear authority and understaff- ing hindered the city’s ability to comprehensively address homelessness or measure the effectiveness of its efforts. After the audit, the mayor announced plans to form the new Department of Housing and Homeless- ness. I am interested to see what our team finds when we follow up on this audit report in the future.

We heard from many members of the community after we attempted to examine the Westin Hotel’s revenue reporting to Denver International Airport. Unfortunately, the audit team could not access needed information. Marriott International impeded audit efforts by deeming as “proprietary” the information necessary for the audit. I called on the mayor and City Council to fix this in the city’s contract with Marriott, and I hope my team will be able to finally conduct the revenue audit in the future.

That conflict — which related to access to third-party information that should be required in every contract — illustrates the importance of other contract compliance audits we completed in 2019. For instance, our audit team looked at the Denver Preschool Program to see how the city oversees the nonprofit organization managing dedicated sales tax funds. We found the nonprofit might have been able to help more kids and preschool providers if it did not save more than necessary and if it invested more money in expanding the preschool program, or if it at least invested its millions of dollars in reserves more profitably. 

Meanwhile, we also took another look at Denver’s affordable housing program after continued concerns from our first audit in 2018 and after ongoing concerns expressed by members of the community. We found weaknesses in how the city makes sure affordable homes stay in the affordable housing inventory. We also found issues with how the city makes sure the affordable housing program is not abused through illegal rentals and other violations.

I was very concerned with management of jail safety, and so I was disappointed after our 2019 audit that the Sheriff Department did not respond with quick agreement and improvement after we made our recommendations. We found the department lacks a comprehensive and systematic approach to identifying risks, ensuring the safety of deputies and inmates, and responding to incidents related to assault, sexual assault, or uses of force. I believe the department must take action to better protect the public, staff, and inmates.

This year, I also placed more emphasis on financial auditing activities. We checked the city’s math on the valuation of the Denver Employees Retirement Plan. We made sure the city was following requirements to secure and use grant funding. And we examined the city’s contract procurement process and found a need for more transparency to avoid conflicts of interest or favoritism in the process.

The Audit Committee continues to contribute valuable feedback on findings from performance and financial audits and risks found through continuous auditing work. I’m also pleased with my team’s continued innovation in data analytics and continuous auditing techniques.

Our Prevailing Wage Division, as part of the new Denver Labor, continued to work extensively with employers and employees to ensure everyone is compensated according to the law. My team more than doubled the amount of money recovered on behalf of workers, collecting $655,000 in restitution, and they also expanded efforts to work with employers to educate them and explain the process.

We also expanded our wage enforcement work for the Denver contractor minimum wage. In July, the city increased the pay for all workers paid using Denver tax dollars or on city property. The minimum applies to all future contracts for city work — including concessions, catering, maintenance, ramp and cargo work, hospitality, security, and other jobs. Our minimum wage team did in-person outreach and created a process for complaint-based investigations. In 2020, the team will continue to expand its work for enforcement for the new citywide minimum wage. All city wage enforcement work is now consolidated within the Denver Auditor’s Office as “Denver Labor.”

We are continuing to work hard to engage the people we work for: the public. Our “Ask the Auditor” video series walks the community through audits and basic functions of the office. I attended more than 50 neighborhood and community events and meetings to talk about what I do and to answer questions. And we reached thousands of people through social media on Nextdoor, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn. Sign up for our newsletter to read about our latest findings or email us at auditor@denvergov.org to share your thoughts, concerns or questions.

I am very proud of our employees’ accomplishments and of our efforts to work with city agencies and residents, employers and employees, to ensure a better Denver for everyone.

Timothy M. O’Brien, CPA, Denver Auditor

Office of the Auditor:
The mission of the Auditor’s Office is to deliver independent, transparent and professional oversight in order to safeguard and improve the public’s investment in Denver. Our work is performed on behalf of everyone who cares about the city, including its residents, workers and decision-makers.

Denver’s Auditor is unique because he is elected by the people and is independent from all other citywide elected officials and city operational management. He works independently from the mayor’s and City Council’s offices to maintain objectivity and offer frank, truthful reports for the betterment of Denver. Auditor Timothy M. O’Brien, CPA, was elected to a four-year term in 2015 and reelected for a second term in 2019.

Denver’s Charter provides for the Auditor to conduct:

  • Financial and performance audits of the City and County of Denver and its departments and agencies in accordance with the Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards;
  • Audits of individual financial transactions, contracts and franchises of the City and County; and
  • Audits of the financial accounting systems and procedures administered by the manager of finance and other departments and agencies of the City and County, including records systems, revenue identification and accounting, and payment practices.

 

The Denver Charter mandates the Auditor follow the Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards published by the U.S. Comptroller General, as well as financial management best practices, and any applicable laws and regulations governing the financial practices of Denver.

Denver’s charter further requires the Auditor to countersign all city contracts to ensure no liability is incurred, no money is disbursed, and no city property is disposed of in a manner contrary to law.

The Auditor’s Office also oversees enforcement of the city’s minimum wage, prevailing wage, and living wage ordinances. That means the Auditor works with both employers and employees to ensure every worker is paid according to the law. The office does outreach and works individually with contractors to help them understand these laws. Analysts also help identify workers’ correct prevailing wage classifications. New in 2020, the office will oversee education and enforcement of the citywide minimum wage law in Denver Labor. The office will work with employ- ers and employees to ensure proper wage payments.

The Auditor is chairman of the Audit Committee, whose primary task is to annually commission an independent external audit of Denver. In addition, results of audits are presented to the Audit Committee. To ensure the committee’s independence, the mayor, the City Council, and the Auditor each appoint two members for four-year terms.

Auditor O’Brien is licensed in Colorado as a certified public accountant, or CPA. He also has a master’s in business administration from the University of Colorado. He holds the designations of chartered financial analyst and char- tered global management accountant. He has more than 40 years of auditing and accounting experience — including time serving as the state auditor — which he uses to ensure Denver’s taxpayer dollars are used efficiently and effectively. He was also chosen as the chairman of the board of trustees of the Colorado Public Employees’ Retirement Association, which provides retirement benefits to more than 500,000 employees across the state.

The Audit Services Division produces independent financial and performance audits and other types of assessments of city agencies, programs, finances, technology, and contracts. The resulting recommendations from these efforts help strengthen governance, improve performance, enhance efficiency, increase revenues, reduce costs and risks, and improve the quality of services for Denver.

Performance audits review the efficiency and effectiveness of agencies’ work, as well as the overall use of Denver tax dollars. Financial audits take a close look at an agency’s records and processes to identify errors in reporting and payments and other risks to the city and its reputation. Meanwhile, contract compliance audits determine whether a third-party vendor — and/or a city agency — is following the terms of a contract. Information technology audits review the controls and operation of the city’s network, software applications, and cybersecurity processes to make sure they are operating correctly.

Key audits completed or commissioned this year included a report about safety concerns for deputies and inmates in Denver’s jails, a disappointing lack of access to information at the Westin hotel at Denver International Airport, and a look at the good intentions but inadequate organization in how Denver serves people experiencing homelessness. The audit teams also looked at how Denver administers contracts and works with third parties, including a look at the Denver Preschool Program and how the nonprofit uses dedicated tax funds. A second affordable housing report found the city was not doing enough to prevent involuntary displacement and that the city’s efforts were not meeting strategic goals of preserving affordable housing.

A follow-up assessment is performed after the last implementation date given by agencies in response to recommendations in each audit. The follow-up reports confirm whether the agreed-upon recommendations were indeed implemented. We follow up on every audit to see if our recommendations are implemented and our findings are impactful.

Our expanding continuous auditing program helps identify high-risk areas of the city by repeatedly performing updated analyses of transactional data from different city databases. Using automation, we sort through thousands of data entries, rather than rely only
on a random sample. This helps inform our risk assessments for current or future audits and can help us focus on areas of higher concern. The resulting reports provide us with timely feedback of anomalies or outliers in the city’s processes and transactions.

Auditor O’Brien also contracts with professional service firms to provide third-party audits and engagements where specialized expertise is needed, such as in a particular industry or tech- nical discipline. This is a cost-effective and efficient way to complete specialized work such as cybersecurity audits or actuarial work, among other areas of focus. Hiring these firms on a contract basis allows our office to expand its range of audits while using taxpayer funds prudently.

Our annual Audit Plan — which includes many different types of engagements intended to address key risks to the city — is compiled from risk assessments of city agencies, input from community members, information from city leaders, current events, regulatory changes and other factors.

The City and County of Denver enters into thousands of contracts every year, and the Denver Charter mandates Auditor O’Brien review and sign every city contract to ensure any liability incurred, any money disbursed or any property disposed of is according to the law. Auditor O’Brien believes progress in the city should not be held up by processes and paperwork. As a result, he is working to get contracts signed more quickly while still ensuring a thorough review. Most contracts are approved within less than 24 hours.

Denver contracts can range from zero-dollar park rentals to multimillion-dollar technology purchases or construction projects. The Auditor’s Office continues to perform contract compliance, financial and specialty audits, evaluations and assessments to address these contracts. These projects utilize both internal audit resources as well as external specialists and subject matter experts from local accounting firms and other specialty consulting practices.

City Council passed the new local mini- mum wage ordinance Nov. 25, 2019. The ordinance sets the hourly citywide min- imum wage at $12.85 in 2020, starting Jan. 1. The separate minimum wage for city contractors and the prevailing wage rate will still apply as determined by law. All three of these areas of wage law are now under one roof known as “Denver Labor” in the Auditor’s Office. Denver Labor will continue efforts in 2020 for both education and enforcement of all wage law through payroll auditing, wage investigations and outreach.

Prevailing Wage Division

Every year, the city takes on billions of dollars’ worth of new projects and construction. The Auditor’s prevailing wage team works with both contractors and workers on all Denver projects to ensure compliance and payment according to the law. We have enforced prevailing wage requirements in Denver since the 1950s. Auditor O’Brien changed the way Denver does business on all projects and changed how work is performed on city property by revamping the city’s Prevailing Wage Ordinance in 2016. Now, his growing team works to bring all parties togeth- er to make Denver an efficient and good place to work.

Wage reporting software, easy-to-use tutorial videos and public question-and-answer sessions all help streamline the process. The simplified process aims to reduce the burden on contractors and encourages more of them to seek work with the city. Our analysts work with employees to ensure the employees are classified correctly, and they also work with employers to guide them through the reporting process.

The role of the Prevailing Wage Division includes education as well as enforcement. Anyone who has questions regarding prevailing wage is encouraged to call our hotline at (720) 913-5000.

Minimum Wage Division

New in 2019, the Denver Auditor’s Office now works to educate and enforce minimum wage across the entire city. The city’s contractor minimum wage began in July 2019 and the citywide minimum wage started Jan. 1, 2020, after the state of Colorado passed a law allowing local governments to set their own minimums independent of state minimums.

The new contractor minimum wage law required all city employees and con- tractors working for the city or on city property to pay a minimum of $13 an hour. That minimum will go up to $14 an hour in July 2020 and up again to $15 per hour on July 1, 2021. Our office developed a complaint-based system to investigate city work including concessions, catering, maintenance, ramp and cargo work at Denver International Airport, hospitality, security, and other jobs on city property.

In 2020, the Auditor’s Office will use existing knowledge and experience to expand again and start enforcing the new citywide minimum wage. The citywide minimum starts at $12.85 an hour in 2020. City leaders estimate more than 50,000 workers will be impacted by the wage increase. We will work to educate employers and employees about the law, and we will conduct investigations based on complaints, data, and trends identified by our office.

Wage complaints should be sent to wagecomplaints@denvergov.org or anyone can submit a complaint form at Denver Labor.

The Denver Auditor and his communications team believe in transparency and accountability in local government. As a check and balance on the “strong mayor system,” we work on behalf of taxpayers to make sure those residents know what is happening in the city. This year, Auditor O’Brien continued to fulfill his promise to keep the public informed by continuing to explore new ways
to reach members of the community where they are and in ways they can understand — through social media, a dynamic website, a successful e-newsletter, videos, media outreach, and many forms of printed informational materials.

The Auditor’s community outreach efforts ensure the important work of the office is more widely known and understood. He regularly attends meetings with registered neighborhood organizations, homeowners’ associations, business associations, universities, and other groups. The public is also invited to participate on our social media platforms: Facebook, Nextdoor, Twitter, LinkedIn — and new in the past year, Instagram. We post unique content on different platforms about community events, important city updates, audit information, labor and wage developments and other key communications.

The Auditor also continues to emphasize visual media, including an ongoing initiative to bring information about auditing and wage enforcement to YouTube and local television through Denver8 TV. This year, we shared on Denver8 TV, YouTube, our website and on social media our monthly public service announcements about how the office works and about important takeaways from audits. The Auditor also expanded our graphics and visualization capabilities for audit reports and public communications to improve residents’ understanding of our work.

The multiplatform approach to outreach helps the Auditor’s Office maintain two-way communication with the people it serves. Residents provide valuable information about what is and is not working in the city. The Auditor always wants to hear from constituents. You are encouraged to contact the office by phone, by email, or at community meetings. You can also join our conversations about current city updates on Facebook or our other social media platforms.

Auditor O’Brien is the chairman of the independent Audit Committee, which meets monthly. The other six members of the committee are appointed to four-year terms by the Auditor, the Mayor and City Council, each of whom appoints two members. The members and their appointing authorities are listed below. Members are appointed based on education or experience in accounting, auditing, financial management or related fields.

Rudolfo (Rudy) Payan, Vice-Chairman (appointed by Auditor O’Brien)
Jack Blumenthal (appointed by Auditor O’Brien)
Leslie Mitchell (appointed by City Council)
Florine Nath (appointed by City Council)
Charles Scheibe (appointed by Mayor Hancock)
Edward Scholz (appointed by Mayor Hancock)

The primary responsibility of the Audit Committee is to commission an annual independent external audit of the city’s finances. The Audit Committee receives the results of all city audits performed or commissioned by the Auditor’s Office, and the results of the annual external audits. In addition to the audits of the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and the Single Audit report of major grant programs, an external CPA firm audits two enterprise fund agencies — Denver International Airport and the Wastewater Management Enterprise Fund. An external firm also audits the Deferred Compensation Plan Trust Fund. Auditor O’Brien and the Audit Committee receive and review the results of these audits and assessments.

2019 Audits and Follow-ups

Workday Post Implementation Assessment

Workday Post Implementation Assessment

Follow-up: Governmental Activities Receivables

Follow-up: Governmental Activities Receivables

Follow-up: Compensation and Benefits

Follow-up: Compensation and Benefits

Follow-up: Contract Controls in Alfresco

Follow-up: Contract Controls in Alfresco

Follow-up: Purchasing and Payment Processes

Follow-up: Purchasing and Payment Processes

Follow-up: Indirect Cost Accounting Practices

Follow-up: Indirect Cost Accounting Practices

Denver Employees Retirement Plan Actuarial Valuation

Denver Employees Retirement Plan Actuarial Valuation

Interstate Highway Construction Inc. Contract

Interstate Highway Construction Inc. Contract

Follow-up: Building Permits

Follow-up: Building Permits

Follow-up: Airport Parking Revenue

Follow-up: Airport Parking Revenue

Follow-up: PetroPro Engineering Inc. Contract

Follow-up: PetroPro Engineering Inc. Contract

Follow-up: Flog, LLC at Willis Case

Follow-up: Flog, LLC at Willis Case

Follow-up: Pahaska Tepee Concessions, LLC

Follow-up: Pahaska Tepee Concessions, LLC

Follow-up: Workforce Development

Follow-up: Workforce Development

Denver Preschool Program

Denver Preschool Program

Property Tax Assessment Process

Property Tax Assessment Process

Urban Area Security Initiative Grant

Urban Area Security Initiative Grant

Airport Improvement Program Grants

Airport Improvement Program Grants

Accounts Receivable – Denver International Airport

Accounts Receivable – Denver International Airport

Cybersecurity Operations – Denver International Airport

Cybersecurity Operations – Denver International Airport

Follow-up: Denver Botanic Gardens

Follow-up: Denver Botanic Gardens

Preserving Affordable Housing for Denver Residents

Preserving Affordable Housing for Denver Residents

Property Tax Spending for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Property Tax Spending for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Data Analytics Update

Data Analytics Update

Follow-up: Aramark Concessions Revenues

Follow-up: Aramark Concessions Revenues

Follow-up: Parks Permitting Program

Follow-up: Parks Permitting Program

Contract Procurement Processes

Contract Procurement Processes

Follow-up: Software Asset Management

Follow-up: Software Asset Management

Follow-up: Personally Identifiable Information in Salesforce

Follow-up: Personally Identifiable Information in Salesforce

Follow-up: Golf Enterprise Fund

Follow-up: Golf Enterprise Fund

Denver’s Road Home – Homeless Services

Denver’s Road Home – Homeless Services

Workday User Access Controls

Workday User Access Controls

Jail Safety

Jail Safety

Denver Public Trustee

Denver Public Trustee

Halcyon Construction Inc. On-Call Contract

Halcyon Construction Inc. On-Call Contract

Westin Hotel Revenue

Westin Hotel Revenue

Data Centers

Data Centers

Professional Details

As an accomplished Certified Public Accountant with more than 40 years of auditing experience, Auditor O’Brien values the professional development and growth of his entire staff. Audit team members met high standards again this year through continued professional learning and achievements, industry conferences, staff presentations, involvement in professional organizations, and community contributions.

In 2019, Denver voters chose to reelect Auditor O’Brien for his second term as Denver Auditor. Auditor O’Brien is a certified public accountant with more than 40 years of auditing experience. He recognizes the importance of professional development, of continuous learning throughout a career and of serving the community in the office and beyond. Auditor’s Office team members met high standards again this year through continued professional learning and achievements, industry conferences, staff presentations, involvement in professional organizations and community contributions.

Audit Services, under the leadership of Auditor O’Brien and Deputy Auditor Valerie Walling, completed impactful, substantial work on behalf of the people of Denver. Our office integrated the auditing specialties and experience of all of our auditors and audit directors to ensure success and impact of our work. We completed performance, financial, information technology, data analytics and compliance audit work.

 

This year, the Auditor’s Office received a national Distinguished Knighton Award from the Association of Local Government Auditors, or ALGA. The professional organization chose our “Affordable Housing” audit for recognition among submissions from auditing offices across the country.

The prestigious Knighton awards recognize the best work from government auditing offices each year. Auditor O’Brien directed his audit team to submit the “Affordable Housing” audit for consideration because of the report’s impact in the community, its comprehensive and extensive research and field work and its overall presentation.

The audit team worked hard on this award-winning audit, including Audit Supervisor Jared Miller, Audit Supervisor Patrick Schafer, Lead Auditor Shaun Wysong, and Associate Auditor Chris Wilson. Audit Director Katja Freeman oversaw the team.

Our office currently has five members who volunteer to serve on and participate in ALGA governing committees. Deputy Auditor Valerie Walling recently began serving on the Awards Commit- tee; Audit Director Katja Freeman is a member of the Professional Issues Committee; Audit Director Dawn Wiseman is on the Membership Committee; Reporting Specialist Kristen Clark serves on the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee; and Reporting Specialist Tim Hoover serves on the Publications Committee.

 

Members of our auditing division also participated in professional conferences throughout the year to further their education and expertise. Auditors who attended educational sessions at conferences earned continuing professional education credits toward meeting requirements of Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards requirements.

Several of our knowledgeable audit staff did presentations at the annual Mountain and Plains Intergovernmental Audit Forum conference, organized by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. Audit Supervisor Kharis Eppstein presented about the Westin Hotel Revenue audit, along with Audit Supervisor Sonia Montano and Lead Auditor Amy Barnes, with Audit Director Dawn Wise- man as the moderator. The title of their presentation was “Auditing Agreements Between Public and Private Entities: Challenges and Considerations for an Evolving Audit Environment.” Audit Analytics Supervisor Sam Gallaher, Senior Auditor Darrell Finke, and Lead Data Analytics Auditor Robert Persichitte all presented at the same conference, with Audit Director Katja Freeman as the moderator. The title of their presentation was “Jail Safety: Using Mixed Methods to Audit A Changing Environment.”

Audit Analytics Supervisor Samuel Gallaher presented several workshops and topics throughout the year, sharing his expertise in data analysis and audit sampling. He presented a four-hour workshop on audit sampling and a four-hour workshop on data analytics at the 2019 ALGA Conference. He also presented at the American Society for Public Administration Conference about new research on audit criteria. He shared his knowledge of data analytics and continuous auditing with the Colorado Springs affiliate of the Institute of Internal Auditors.

 

Lead Data Analytics Auditor Robert Persichitte also helped share our innovative techniques for data analytics at the ALGA Conference, as well as in presentations for the Institute of Internal Auditors and the Colorado Society of Certified Public Accountants.

Our auditors’ expertise and knowledge are valuable to auditors across Colorado and the United States, and we are happy to share our experience with our peers and support the progress of government auditing. Our data analytics and continuous auditing techniques are some of the most advanced in the country and we are proud to continue to develop more efficient ways to monitor city risks.

Auditor O’Brien, Denver Labor Executive Director Jeffrey Garcia, and the labor team had a year of growth and significant impact in 2019, culminating in the creation of our new office: Denver Labor. The Prevailing Wage Division continues to build relationships in the construction community to encourage contractors to pay employees accord- ing to the law. The team worked on more than 700 projects worth $4.7 billion across the city. In July, the city’s new contractor minimum wage began, and our office created a new Minimum Wage Division and a complaint-based system for investigation. This new project was a precursor for the upcoming continued expansion of our office’s wage enforcement work through the citywide minimum wage. The new citywide minimum wage is expected to impact more than 50,000 workers across the city.

Many talented, well-educated, and hard-working people comprise our staff. This year, our team worked to improve their work, themselves, our office, and our industry.

Deputy Auditor Valerie Walling served as a member of the Jefferson County Audit Committee and she was also named to the Institute of Internal Auditors’ Denver board.

Our Safety Committee helped keep members of our office safe and healthy this year with the leadership and support of committee members: Edyie Thompson, Kharis Eppstein, Noah McKechnie, LaKeshia Allen Horner, Darrell Finke, Brian Cheli, Rafael Gongón, Daniel Summers, Vilma Balnyte, Nicholas Jimroglou, and Alexandra Dickerson.

Our New Employee Onboarding Committee worked hard this year to start updating our process for welcoming new employees and teaching them how the office works. Committee members included: Tammy Phillips, Edyie Thompson, Emily Owens Gerber, Dawn Wiseman, Sonia Montano, Anna Hansen, Vilma Balnyte, Tayler Overschmidt, Valerie Walling, and Kharis Eppstein.

Our Events Committee brought the office together for some fun relationship-building competitions and pot-lucks, including our green chili-themed cooking contest, our picnic lunch at Civic Center Park, and the annual holiday party. Thanks to committee members Rafael Gongón, Cyndi Lubrano, Anna Hansen, Cody Schulte, Kharis Eppstein, Arielle Denis, Brandon Stolba, Shaun Wysong and Susan Keller for your fun ideas and organization!